Roasting/Grilling Guide—80 Fruits and Vegetables


Roasting or Grilling for Intense Flavors—Great Before Dehydrating!


Roasting or grilling is a great way to prepare fruits and vegetables. The flavors often lost to peeling, chopping, seeding and so on are instead mingled under the heat to add to the flavor and sweetness.

With foods you may be dehydrating, roasting can sweeten and intensify the flavors. The absence of prep work makes these all much easier and can increase nutrients and cut food waste by making otherwise discarded parts taste delicious. The minimal preparation work is always a plus. The extra bonus comes with a shortened drying time because water is pulled out in the roasting process!

If you are into making jams, jellies, or fruit preserves, try grilling the fruits first. Instead of starting with fruit, start with grilled fruit. No one is going to make a jam or jelly that tastes as good as yours. Dried Fruit Leathers have an extra layer of sweetness as well when fruits are first roasted before puréeing.

When they are roasted or grilled, they have a sweetness and texture that cannot be duplicated with boiling, baking, frying, steaming or slow cooking. Those oven brown spots or the grill marks add a whole new dimension to cooking fruits and vegetables. The sugars in the fruit/vegetables will caramelize with the high heat, producing a whole new taste in your produce.

To make sure your oven-roasted dishes tantalize your taste buds, it is important to keep in mind that different vegetables need different roasting times. Softer and moister vegetables such as peppers, leeks, zucchini, asparagus, tomatoes, mushrooms, and green beans take less time than hard root vegetables such as potatoes, parsnips, rutabagas, celery root, beets, and carrots. Fruits all seem to need about 15-20 minutes roasting/grilling time. Of course, this depends on how they are cut (see chart). Gain a lot of flavor when grilling or roasting, the little sugar in vegetables caramelizes and brings a new layer of flavor to the veggies. Grilling seems to do this better than oven roasting, but both do the job very well. The rule of thumb for oven roasting is (400ºF and 25-30 minutes for roasting vegetables).

Combining vegetables with similar roasting times is an easy way to create a delicious, evenly cooked vegetarian side or main dish (for foods with similar roasting times, see charts below). You can of course also combine foods with varied roasting times – just add the faster-cooking vegetables to the oven later or pre-cook hard root vegetables on the stove top.

If you are not using a conventional oven or if you use another roasting temperature, the roasting times may differ significantly. You should also note that the way you prepare your veggies will have an impact on how long the roasting time will be (whole vegetables take longer than finely diced or sliced vegetables). The vegetable roasting charts below also show the preparation method/size of the vegetable required to meet the indicated roasting time.


To roast fruits and vegetables in a preheated conventional oven:

  1. Place prepared produce in a baking pan lined with parchment paper to prevent them from sticking. (Since acids in some foods react to aluminum foil, I find parchment paper a better option.)
  2. Tossing the fruit/vegetables with oil will also cut sticking; however, if you like healthier recipes, skip the oil. If you are going to dehydrate the fruit or vegetable after roasting, do NOT use oils; dry roasting is preferred.
  3. If you are roasting without oil, moisten the fruit/vegetables by adding a small amount of water or vegetable stock to the bottom of the roasting pan. Alternatively, you can use chicken broth, wine, tomato juice, freshly pressed orange juice, lemon juice, vinegar, or soy sauce if you are not dehydrating your produce after roasting.
  4. After arranging the fruit/vegetables on the pan, place the pan on the middle rack in the oven. Stir occasionally and cook until tender and lightly browned.
  5. Whether roasting fruit/vegetables with or without oil, it is important to check the food regularly and give it a stir and if the vegetables look dry. You should also note that the roasting times for different vegetables can vary significantly. Use our Charts below, which show the approximate cooking times for common fruits and vegetables, as a broad guideline. Keep in mind, however, that the type of the oven, the texture of the fruit/vegetables, the preparation method, and personal preferences can result in significant deviations from suggested cooking times.
  6. Your produce is done when it reaches the caramelization (browned) stage you wish. Skins on some produce (such as peppers) will have blackened areas.

To grill fruits and vegetables on a gas grill:

  1. Place smaller prepared veggies or fruit in a baking pan lined with parchment paper in order to prevent them from sticking. (Since acids in some foods react to aluminum foil, I find parchment paper a better option.)
  2. Tossing the produce with oil will also cut sticking; however, if you like healthier recipes, skip the oil. If you are going to dehydrate the fruit or vegetable after grilling, do NOT use oils; dry roasting is preferred.
  3. Stir/Turn occasionally and cook until tender and lightly browned.
  4. It is important to check the food regularly and give it a stir and if the vegetables look dry.
  5. Your produce is done when it reaches the caramelization (browned) stage you wish. Skins on some produce (such as peppers) will have blackened areas.

Vegetable Roasting Times Chart

In pre-heated to 400°F/200°C /gas mark 6/Medium-High on Grill

Vegetable Size/Preparation Roasting time (in minutes)
Acorn squash Halved and seeded; place cut side up on the baking sheet 50-60
Artichokes, baby Trimmed baby artichokes, whole or halved 25-35
Asparagus Whole asparagus, trimmed 20-25
Baby squash Halved 20-25
Beets, small Whole, unpeeled beets scrubbed clean; wrapped in aluminum foil; peel off the skins after roasting 50-60
Belgian endives Sliced in half 25-35
Bell peppers Cut into thin strips 20-25
Broccoli Cut into 1 to 2 inch pieces 20-25
Brussels sprouts Trimmed and halved 15-20
Buttercup squash Peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks 20-25
Butternut squash Peeled and seeded; quartered lengthwise, then cut into 1-inch pieces 35-45
Carrots Peeled or scrubbed, cut into ½-inch sticks 15-20
Carrots Cut into 1-inch thick slices 35-45
Carrots, baby Roast whole baby carrots 25-35
Cauliflower 1 ½-inch cauliflower florets 25-35
Celery root
(celeriac)
Cut into cubes or large matchsticks 35-45
Cherry tomatoes Roast whole 15-20
Cipollini onions Roast whole 25-35
Corn on the cob Husks removed 20-25
Corn on the cob Whole, in husks 25-35
Daikon radishes Peeled and cut into about 1-inch by ½-inch dices 35-45
Eggplant Cut into ½-inch thick slices; add salt before roasting to draw out extra moisture 25-35
Fennel bulb Trimmed and cut into 10-12 wedges 25-35
Fennel bulb Trimmed and cut into 10-12 wedges 35-45
Garlic Peeled and cut into very thin slices 20-25
Garlic Peeled and cut into thin slices 15-20
Garlic Peeled and each clove halved or sliced 25-35
Green beans
(string beans)
Whole beans, trimmed 15-20
Jerusalem artichokes
(sun chokes)
Peeled or scrubbed and cut into ¼-inch thick slices 35-45
Kohlrabi Peeled and cut into ½-inch thick slices 25-35
Kohlrabi Peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes 35-45
Leeks Tough green tops trimmed off; sliced 20-25
Mushrooms, cremini Halved lengthwise 15-20
Mushrooms, king trumpet Cut lengthwise into ½-inch slices 15-20
Mushrooms, oyster Torn into strips 15-20
Mushrooms, portabella Cut lengthwise into ½-inch slices 15-20
Mushrooms, white button Halved lengthwise 15-20
New potatoes Scrubbed and unpeeled; halved 35-45
Okra, small Whole okra, trimmed 20-25
Parsnips Peeled and cut into thin strips 15-20
Parsnips Peeled and cut into cubes, or sliced diagonally into ½-inch thick slices 35-45
Pearl onions Roast whole 25-35
Potatoes, baking Peeled or scrubbed, cut into 1-inch thick slices 35-45
Radishes Whole radishes, trimmed 20-25
Radishes Whole radishes, trimmed 15-20
Red onions 1/4-inch slices 15-20
Red onions Halved 25-35
Rutabagas Peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes 35-45
Shallots Whole or halved 15-20
Sweet peppers Cut into 1-inch wide strips 25-35
Sweet potatoes Halved crosswise, then cut into 1-inch wedges 25-35
Tomatillos Whole tomatillos, papery husks removed 20-25
Tomatoes, plum Roast whole tomatoes or cut in half for faster roasting 25-35
Tomatoes, slicing Cut into 1/4’s (uniform sizes for best times) 35-45
Turnips Peeled and cut into 1-inch cubes or each cut into 6 wedges 25-35
Wax beans Whole beans, trimmed

15-20

Yellow onions, large Each cut into 10-12 wedges or into ¼-inch thick slices 25-35
Yellow summer squash Cut into ½-inch thick slices 20-25
Zucchini Quartered and sliced into 1-inch sticks, add salt before roasting to draw out extra moisture 20-25
Zucchini Halved crosswise, then quartered; add salt before roasting to draw out extra moisture 15-20

Fruit Roasting Times Chart

In pre-heated to 400°F/200°C /gas mark 6/Medium-High on Grill

(Remember that hot sugar will burn you, so let the fruit cool a bit before putting it in your mouth.)

Fruits Size/Preparation Roasting time (in minutes)
Apples Core the apple and slice into ½ inch rounds. 15-20
Apricots Cut the nectarine in half and carefully remove the pit. 15-20
Bananas Peel the banana. Cut the banana lengthwise or leave whole. 15-20
Cantaloupe Cut the cantaloupe into 1 inch wedges and remove the skin. 15-20
Cherries Use a grill-safe dish or mat to keep cherries from falling through the grates. 15-20
Figs Cut the figs in half lengthwise. 15-20
Grapes Leave the grapes in small bunches so they will stay on the grill. 15-20
Lemons Slice the lemon into ¼ inch rounds, peel on. 15-20
Mangoes Peel the Mango and slice the meat away from the large flat seed. You will have two large flat slices that are ready to grill. Any excess mango you can salvage from the seed can be used raw. 15-20
Nectarines Cut the nectarine in half and carefully remove the pit (not usually a freestone pit). 15-20
Oranges Slice the ends off either end of the orange and then slice into ½ inch rounds. 15-20
Papayas Depending on the size of the papaya, small Hawaiian or large Mexican, Cut the fruit into ½ inch thick strips, remove the seeds and skin. 15-20
Peaches Wash the fuzz off the peach, cut in half lengthwise and remove the hopefully freestone pit. 15-20
Pears Cut the pears in half and remove the core and seeds. 15-20
Pineapples Remove the outer surface of the pineapple until all the scales have been removed. Cut in half lengthwise or use a pineapple corer. This will determine whether you will have spears or rounds. Either way they should be about 1/4 inch thick. 15-20
Plantains Peel the plantain and cut in half lengthwise. 15-20
Plums Cut the plums in half lengthwise and remove the pit. 15-20

Roast/Toast Nuts (Oven Method)

Make sure nuts are shelled and of uniform size.

  1. Spread nuts in a single layer on a baking pan (one with walls is best) for toasting in the oven. Cook at 400°F for 7 to 10 minutes or until the nuts start to turn golden. Shake the pan halfway through toasting.
  2. Remove them from the cooking pan as soon as they’re done.
  3. Toasted nuts have a deeper, more concentrated flavor than raw nuts.
  4. Nuts have high concentrations of natural oil, so it is not necessary to add oil when toasting nuts.

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Roast/Toast Nuts (Skillet Method)

Make sure nuts are shelled and of uniform size.

  1. Place nuts in a single layer for toasting in a skillet. With the skillet over medium-high heat, stir or shake the nuts continually for 5 to 7 minutes or until they start to turn golden.
  2. Remove them from the cooking pan as soon as they’re done.
  3. Toasted nuts have a deeper, more concentrated flavor than raw nuts
  4. Nuts have high concentrations of natural oil, so it is not necessary to add oil when toasting nuts.

©2017 21st Century Simple Living www.21stcenturysimpleliving.com

2 thoughts on “Roasting/Grilling Guide—80 Fruits and Vegetables

  1. debbie says:

    Awesome info! I sure could have used the parchment paper idea when I stupidly dry roasted the red peppers on my good cookie sheet. It will never be the same, but the peppers were amazing! Thanks for all the handy charts!!

    1. Admin says:

      You are most welcome Debbie 🙂

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