Flavored Syrups for Everything (Not Just Coffee or Cocktails)


~More than just sweeteners, infused syrups are the ultimate flavor-booster from drinks to cakes to morning coffee~


syrups02I have over a hundred recipes I have developed for flavored syrups. Why you ask? Simple syrups can be as varied and diverse as any other food stuff. By mixing in extracts, herbs, fruit—truly anything you can imagine—you have instant flavored sweetener. And you do not have to worry about gluten additives or thickeners so they are also gluten-free!

  • Drizzle on a simple butter-rich pound cake for a seasonal flavor boost,
  • Replace kool aid and other powdered drinks with simple syrup flavoring and water—a much better, all-natural alternative,
  • Slather over pancakes, waffles, and mix in oatmeal for breakfast,
  • Pack several bottles onto an ice cream sundae bar for a birthday celebration,
  • Add to bottles with pour-spouts for great serve-yourself snow cones for that next pool party,
  • Add a splash to whipped cream for sweet spice, to cakes for a flavor boost, or frosting for an awesome topping,
  • Stir into your morning coffee or tea to cut out the Starbucks middle man,
  • Cover pieces of meat and throw on the grill for a different kind of barbecue,
  • Or use it in all manner of cocktails for a tinge of sweet flavor.

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I will list a few of my recipes here to show you how simple it is to achieve wonderful flavors easily. These should get your creative juices flowing. Please note the variations at the bottom of each recipe for inspiration in using many other different products to achieve a variety of flavors. Once you make your own flavored syrups you will never go back to Starbucks, Country Time, Arizona Teas, or Torani’s again.

You can also mix your flavors. A nice pumpkin spice syrup for that mermaid-logoed coffee or a wonderful strawberry-rhubarb syrup for a shrub or wine cooler is delicious and just as easy to make!

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Recipes

syrups04All of the recipes here can be used with any kind of sweetener–white sugar, raw sugar, glucose, crystalline fructose sugars, honey, maltodextrin, stevia, artificial sweeteners, agave, maple sugar, or even sugar alcohols/polyols–however, some may need further refining to complete your simple syrup. Adjust according to your tastes.

When using your flavor variations, you may need to adjust for taste. For example, each fruit has a differing concentration of taste meaning that what might be an adequate amount with one syrup is not the same for another. This isn’t a big deal because ratios can be adjusted by taste. I found that peach has a very light taste, blueberries and raspberries are bold with strawberries and rhubarb in the middle. Additionally, depending on the flavor of your sweetener, you may need to use more to have the flavor come through and shine when mixing with strong honeys, etc.

A Word about Storage

These syrups have no preservatives, so they are not shelf stable and must be kept in the refrigerator.

In general, you can expect infused simple syrups (ones that extract flavor from herbs and spices before straining) to last up to 3 months—often longer (as long as it smells good, it tastes good). Syrups that incorporate fruit and vegetable purées or juices however, won’t last as long, more like 2–3 weeks.

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Almond Syrup (Extract Base)

Makes 1-1/4 cup

Ingredients
1 cup raw cane or white sugar
1 cup water
1/2 teaspoon to 1 tablespoon almond extract*

Directions

  1. In a saucepan combine raw cane sugar and water. Stir until raw cane sugar is dissolved to prevent scorching.
  2. Bring to a rolling boil. Remove from heat and cool to room temperature.
  3. Stir in almond extract to desired strength, starting with 1/2 teaspoon.
  4. Store in a closed container in the refrigerator.

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*Variations:

Use any extract flavor you like to achieve a flavored syrup. Some great choices are Vanilla, Butterscotch, Coconut, Hazelnut, Maple, Anise, Lemon, Orange, Peppermint, Root Beer, or Rum extract.

 

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Tea Syrup (Loose Leaf Tea Base)

syrups05Makes about 1 quart (4 cups)

Ingredients
3 1/2 cups water
3/4 cup loose black tea leaves*
1-1/2 cups raw cane or white sugar

Directions

  1. Bring water to a boil. Remove from heat and add tea. Let steep for 6 to 8 minutes.
  2. Strain and add sugar. Stir until sugar is dissolved. Store in the refrigerator.

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To make tea: Put 3-1/2 tablespoons of syrup in a glass. Add water and ice. Stir.

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*Variations:

Use Green tea, White tea, Oolong, Red Raspberry Leaf tea, or any of your herb tea blends in place of the black tea leaves.

Try the herbal tea blends in Italian sodas, bubble tea, and iced tea.

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Fresh Mint Syrup (Fresh Herb Base)

Makes 1-1/2 cups

Ingredients
Handful of FRESH mint leaves (3/4 to 1 cup, chopped)*
1-1/2 cups water
1-1/2 cups raw cane or white sugar

Directions

  1. Fill a 1-quart (4 cup) jar or container with the fresh mint. Set aside.
  2. In a saucepan on medium heat, combine raw cane sugar and water. Stir until raw cane sugar is dissolved to prevent scorching.
  3. Bring to a rolling boil. Remove from heat and cool until just warm.
  4. Pour syrup over the mint leaves, stir, and infuse for about 20 minutes. Strain and chill before using. Keep stored in the refrigerator.

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*Variations:

You can use any fresh herb, edible flower, or combination you’d like for this. Some choices I enjoy are thyme, fennel, anise, rose, basil, sage, lavender, and eucalyptus. Any of the mint family like spearmint, catnip, and pineapple mint are truly delicious. Add a squeeze of fresh lemon if you wish to really brighten up the flavors!

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Creamsicle Orange Syrup (Citrus Base)

syrups03Makes 1-1/4 cups

Ingredients
2 cups water
2 cups raw cane or white sugar
1 large orange*
1 vanilla pod or 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Directions

  1. Combine sugar and water in a medium saucepan over medium high heat. Stir occasionally until sugar dissolves.
  2. Using a vegetable peeler, remove the peel of the orange in strips, avoiding the pith. Add to the saucepan.
  3. Juice the orange and add to the saucepan.
  4. Remove the seeds from the vanilla pod and reserve for another use. Add the pod (or extract) to the syrup, and simmer for 15-20 minutes, until reduced by 1/3, or until you reach the desired consistency.
  5. Remove the pod and peel, cool syrup to room temperature, and refrigerate.

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If you want a clearer syrup, you can strain the syrup through a coffee filter while still hot.

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*Variations:

You can also make this using 2 large lemons or 3 limes or any other citrus fruit you wish.

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Blueberry Syrup (Whole Berry Base)

Makes 1 cup

Ingredients
1-1/2 cups mashed blueberries (fresh or frozen)*
1 cup raw cane or white sugar
1 cup Water

Directions

  1. Combine raw cane sugar, water, and blueberries in a saucepan, and bring to a boil, stirring occasionally.
  2. When mixture boils reduce heat and simmer for 15 minutes.
  3. Remove from heat and strain syrup into a container. Store in refrigerator.

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*Variations:

You can use any berry you like with this recipe. Some that have worked well for me are strawberries, cranberries, blackberries, raspberries, loganberries, and boysenberries. Grapes and cherries work as well.

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Banana Syrup (Whole Fruit Base)

syrups01Makes 1 cup

Ingredients
1 cup raw cane or white sugar
1 cup water
1 tablespoon dark molasses
1-1/2 tablespoons raw honey
1 ripe banana*

Directions

  1. Add sugar, molasses, honey, and water to a saucepan and heat on high until the sugar has dissolved and the mixture turns clear.
  2. While the mixture is heating, peel and slice a banana into generous sized chunks. You’ll be chopping these up more over the course of preparing the syrup, so don’t make them too small.
  3. Once the sugar is dissolved in the saucepan, add the banana slices and remove from heat.
  4. Let cool for about 15 minutes. With a spoon or butter knife, slice the bananas into smaller pieces against the side of the bowl. As the syrup cools, more flavors are released. By adding more surface area of the banana in increments, you’ll add a few more layers of fresh banana flavor.
  5. Slice the bananas again every 15-20 minutes. When the mixture is completely cool and the sweetness is to your liking, strain the banana using a small mesh strainer. If there seems to be a lot of simple syrup remaining on the bananas, pour 1-1/2 tablespoons of hot water over the bananas to get the excess out.
  6. Pour into an airtight container and refrigerate.

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Use the leftover bananas by heating them and spreading over pancakes or add to your oatmeal. Or add to the puree of a fruit roll-up before dehydrating.

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*Variations:

You can use just about any fruit you like for this flavored syrup recipe. All that is required is to peel your fruit first. Apples, peaches, nectarines, apricots, papaya, and pineapple all work well.

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Ginger Syrup (Root, Seed, or Nut Base)

Makes 1-1/4 cup

Ingredients
1 cup granulated sugar
1 cup water
1/3 cup finely chopped, peeled, fresh ginger*

Directions

  1. In a medium saucepan, combine the sugar, water, and ginger. Bring to a low boil over medium heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar completely.
  2. Simmer for 30 minutes, uncovered, stirring occasionally.
  3. Strain the syrup through a fine mesh sieve, pressing on the ginger to extract as much liquid as possible. Discard the solids.
  4. Pour into an airtight container and refrigerate.

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*Variations:

You can use any root, seed, or nut you desire with this method. Try cardamom, hazelnut, clove bud, turmeric, almond slivers, sarsaparilla root, or licorice root.

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Well there you have it. You have now learned how easy it is, with 7 basic recipes, to make literally hundreds of different syrups! What flavors are you going to try?


©2016 21st Century Simple Living www.21stcenturysimpleliving.com

10 thoughts on “Flavored Syrups for Everything (Not Just Coffee or Cocktails)

  1. Jamie Marie says:

    very nice post, how about a pumpkin spice syrup for coffee, yum! *Coffee addict in the house*
    Thanks so much for sharing on the homesteader hop!

    1. Admin says:

      Jamie, got a recipe for that too here… http://www.21stcenturysimpleliving.com/?p=1034

  2. Macy Lyn says:

    These are great! I am going to make several. I was wondering how long the syrup keeps on the fridge? Thanks for another helpful and money saving idea.

    1. Admin says:

      Lol…I am sorry. I thought I had put it in the article, but I will fix that. In general, you can expect infused simple syrups (ones that extract flavor from herbs and spices before straining) to last up to 3 months—often longer (as long as it smells good, it tastes good). Syrups that incorporate purées or juices however, won’t last as long: more like 2–3 weeks.

  3. Jami says:

    Once bottled and place in the fridge, how long will they last? When should I discard?

    1. Admin says:

      Sorry, thought I put that in the article. I will add it. But in general, you can expect infused simple syrups (ones that extract flavor from herbs and spices before straining) to last up to 3 months—often longer (as long as it smells good, it tastes good). Syrups that incorporate purées or juices however, won’t last as long: more like 2–3 weeks.

  4. Ellen says:

    I think you just saved me some money! I’ve been thinking that I need to order coconut syrup because I’m almost out. Now I can just refill the bottle with homemade. Thank-you.

    1. Admin says:

      You are most welcome Ellen 🙂 you can make a lot of bottles from that little bottle of coconut extract !!!

  5. Pam says:

    Oh my goodness I love this. I don’t drink coffee or alcohol but there are so many things I will use this for, starting with hot chocolate and moving on from there. 🙂

    1. Admin says:

      Great for making you own “koolaid”, sodas, and flavored teas too !!! Plus baking and ice cream and snow cones and…lol

Comments are closed.