Dehydrating Winter Vegetables & What to make with the Powders (For any Pumpkin, Winter Squash, Carrot, & Sweet Potatoes) eBook


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Pumpkin is one of the most popular flavors and rightly so. Pumpkin is a very healthy food-low in calories and high in vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and fiber.  Pumpkins are easy to grow and inexpensive to buy in the fall. Easy to use and store, pumpkin powder is all natural, with none of the sulfites you may find in commercial pumpkin flours, preservative-free, and a gluten-free replacement. Simple, chemical free dehydrated pumpkin, ground to create a fresh, sweet and authentic pumpkin taste and aroma. It is a great way to store healthy pumpkin in your pantry or in your emergency stash of food. We have also included 42 of our favorite recipes for you to enjoy.

A convenient substitute for fresh pumpkin; you can use powdered pumpkin in all the ways you use puréed pumpkin now. Just 1/2 cup rehydrates into 2 cups of purée for many cooking needs like pies, soups, and sauces. In addition you can use it in the same ways you would use pumpkin flour to add to breads, cakes, cookies, yogurt, pastas, and even coffee lattes! Many folks use pumpkin powder to replace some of the flour in breads and baked goods to produce some interesting foods. It is even used in homemade skin care products. And yes, these work for any Winter Squash, Carrot, & Sweet Potatoes as well!

As indicated by its rich orange color, Pumpkin has plenty of antioxidants like beta carotene and Vitamin A. Studies show that beta carotene may promote cardiovascular health and Vitamin A also promotes collagen production, promoting healthy skin. Evidence suggests Vitamin A is beneficial to ovary health as well. Research also shows that the intake of carotenoids is helpful in glucose metabolism in some people. Pumpkin is also a good source of Vitamin E, Thiamin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Iron, Magnesium and Phosphorus, and a very good source of Vitamin C, Riboflavin, Potassium, Copper, Manganese and Dietary Fiber. In addition, pumpkin has several essential fatty acids.

And while you can buy pumpkins and store them for a number of months, they will develop soft spots and they take up a good amount of room. Since pumpkin purée cannot be safely canned, you only other options are freezing the purée or dehydrating. My money for long-term storage and year-round use is dehydrating pumpkin into one of my favorite powders.

These procedures and accompanying recipes can also be used with the following:

  • Most Winter Squash
  • Carrots
  • Sweet Potatoes

Colleen E. Bohrer, author
Dehydrating Winter Vegetables & What to make with the Powders
(For any Pumpkin, Winter Squash, Carrot, & Sweet Potatoes)
From the archives of 21st Century Simple Living
Publication date:  September 20, 2017
First Edition
68 pages
Price $3.99

 

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2 thoughts on “Dehydrating Winter Vegetables & What to make with the Powders (For any Pumpkin, Winter Squash, Carrot, & Sweet Potatoes) eBook

  1. Donna says:

    Love these ebooks. Thanks for sharing them. I have bought 10 or so and they had been very helpful.

    1. Admin says:

      Thank you. So glad you find them useful 🙂

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